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The Strength Behind The Strong was founded by Christine Hofmann-Bourque, who is proud to have a husband in the Army, three brothers in the Navy and Army, and a sister-in-law in the Army. Christine is also a professional journalist. Read our first post to find out why this website is so close to her heart. More >>

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Monday
Feb152010

A Perfect Kiss: Learn the secret to cookies that travel without getting trashed

Whatever you call them — Kiss Cookies, Peanut Butter Blossoms, or just pure heaven — these chocolate-and-peanut-butter delights have been an American tradition for more than 50 years. The now-famous cookies made their debut back in 1957 when Freda Smith of Ohio and her “Peanut Blossoms” recipe advanced to the finals of the Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest.

The cookies have only one downside: They’re impossible to stack in care packages, so they’re pretty much guaranteed to arrive in Iraq or Afghanistan in sad crumbles. 

But there is an easy solution …

Photograph of typical peanut butter kiss cookies, with kisses pointing upward. From thestrengthbehindthestrong.com.

By making one little tweak to the recipe, you can help them journey safely overseas: Simply insert the chocolate kiss candies upside-down in the cookies.

Photograph of modified peanut butter kiss cookies, with points shoved into the cookie and flat bottom pointing upward. From thestrengthbehindthestrong.com.

The cookies are as delicious as their right-side-up cousins, but the flat candy bottoms — now peeking out of the top — make the cookies easy to stack and pack for shipping.

Photograph showing how the modified peanut butter kiss cookies stack neatly, with no wobbling. From thestrengthbehindthestrong.com.

Recipes for success
There are hundreds of versions of this cookie recipe posted online, but you can’t go wrong with these two classics:

Military morsel
World War II disrupted the production of Hershey’s Kisses chocolates for the only time since their introduction in 1907. No chocolate kisses were made from 1942 to 1949 because of shortages — and rationing — of aluminum foil, which is used to wrap these sweet treats. 

Reader Comments (5)

This is such a great idea! I bet it cuts down on chocolate drips as well. I will be trying this in my next care package. Waxed paper works well in between layers of cookies like this, btw.

February 20, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterRebecca

I package cookies in a big Ziploc gallon bag, then put a drinking straw in the bag before sealing it all the way up to the straw. THEN, suck the air out of the bag with the straw, and quickly yank it out and finish sealing the bag. It seems a little silly, but you really get the excess air out that way, and the cookies stay soft and fresh longer.

February 27, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterSuzanne

What a clever idea, turning the chcolate kisse upside down. I love to back cookies and now that Bette sent this site to me I am going to bake cookies and send to the guys and gals . Does anyone know where to send the care packages?

March 6, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterPat Tremain

I send my hubby cookies in every care package. He says when he gets cookies in ziploc baggies they tend to be in pieces despite my careful wrapping. I have found it works better using Pringles tubes! You can stack the cookies (like above) and also keep them from being crushed as the box is thrown around. I also put some cling wrap over the top before I secure the lid as it will pop open otherwise. Hope this helps!

October 24, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterMelisse

Just saw a great cookie-sending tip in one of my favorite magazines...thought I'd share here: Package flat cookies in a round tin, and instead of parchment paper or wax paper rounds in between the layers, use FLOUR TORTILLAS! They help keep cookies from drying out en route, just like a slice of apple or Wonder Bread that grandma used to toss into the cookie jar at home to keep her treats soft. GENIUS! I can't wait to try it for two care packages I'm prepping before Thanksgiving!

November 6, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterSuzanne

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